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SQL Server 2012 Hosting Belgium - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Fix Distribution setup SQL Server Agent error: "RegCreateKeyEx() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.'" ?

clock October 15, 2019 12:15 by author Peter

With this short article, I will tell you about How to Fix Distribution setup SQL Server Agent error: "RegCreateKeyEx() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.'" on my SQL Server 2012 Hosting.

In the Configure Distribution Wizard, the step "Configuring SQL Server Agent to start automatically" errors with the following text:

TITLE: Configure Distribution Wizard
------------------------------
An error occurred configuring SQL Server Agent.
------------------------------
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
RegCreateKeyEx() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.' (Microsoft SQL Server, Error: 22002)

This is a very minor error, and not difficult to work around at all. The wizard is making an attempt to alter the SQL Server Agent service "Start Mode" to Automatic. you'll be able to try this via the SQL Server Configuration Manager instead.

In the Sysinternals method Monitor, you'll see: Operation: RegCreateKey Result: ACCESS DENIED Path: "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\SQLAgent$SQL2012"

 

If you encounter this error, choose "No" in the "SQL Server Agent Start" page in the configure Distribution Wizard (as shown below), so set your agent service to Automatic start Mode via the SQL Server Configuration Manager.

The third step of the wizard that failed before won't happen. Why the failure truly happens I didn't figure this out, and i am open to feedback, however this seems like a vestigial step to a wizard that otherwise has no negative impact. Running SSMS with "run as Administrator" doesn't seem to fix this error either. i would like to recognize why this error happens within the 1st place.

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2012 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes. We have customers from around the globe, spread across every continent. We serve the hosting needs of the business and professional, government and nonprofit, entertainment and personal use market segments.



SQL Server Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Instead Of Triggers

clock September 4, 2019 12:41 by author Peter

Instead of triggers are used to skip DML commands. They fire when you try to execute insert, update or delete statement but instead of executing these commands trigger actually works and trigger functionality executes.
 

Example
    create table approved_emp ( eid int identity(1,1), ename varchar(30)) 
    create table emp ( id int identity(1,1) , ename varchar(30), AddedBy varchar(30)) 
      
    Create trigger instead_of on approved_emp 
    instead of insert 
    as 
    begin 
    declare @name varchar(30) 
    select @name=ename from inserted 
    insert into temp_audit values(@name, USER ) 
    end 


So, basically, trigger will work as, when we will try to add new record in approved_emp table, instead of inserting new records it will add ename into emp table. No data will reflect in approved_emp table as trigger is fired on the table every time while adding data into that table.
 
You can also create instead of triggers for update and delete as well.
 



SQL Server Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Rename SQL Server Database

clock July 24, 2019 12:47 by author Peter

Database Administrators usually use the sp_renamedb system stored procedure to quickly rename a SQL Server Database. However, the drawback of using sp_renamedb is that it doesn't rename the Logical and Physical names of the underlying database files. It's a best practice to make sure the Logical Name and Physical File Name of the database is also renamed to reflect the actual name of the database to avoid any confusion with backup, restore or detach/attach operations.

Let's first create a new database named CoreDB using the T-SQL below:

USE master
GO
IF EXISTS (SELECT name FROM sys.databases WHERE name = N'CoreDB')
DROP DATABASE CoreDB
GO
USE master
GO
CREATE DATABASE [CoreDB]
ON PRIMARY
(
NAME = N'CoreDB',
FILENAME = N'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.SQL2008\MSSQL\DATA\CoreDB.mdf' ,
SIZE = 2048KB ,
FILEGROWTH = 1024KB
)
LOG ON
(
NAME = N'CoreDB_log',
FILENAME = N'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.SQL2008\MSSQL\DATA\CoreDB_log.ldf' ,
SIZE = 1024KB ,
FILEGROWTH = 10%
)
GO

Rename CoreDB Database Using sp_renamedb System Stored Procedure

Now let's rename the CoreDB database to ProductsDB by executing the below T-SQL code.

USE master
GO
ALTER DATABASE CoreDB
SET SINGLE_USER

WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
GO
EXEC master..sp_renamedb 'CoreDB','ProductsDB'
GO
ALTER DATABASE ProductsDB
SET MULTI_USER
GO

Once the above T-SQL has executed successfully the database name will change however the Logical Name and File Name will not change. You can verify this by executing the T-SQL below:

USE master
GO
/* Identify Database File Names */
SELECT

name AS [Logical Name],
physical_name AS [DB File Path],
type_desc AS [File Type],
state_desc AS [State]
FROM sys.master_files
WHERE database_id = DB_ID(N'ProductsDB')
GO

Your output should look something like this from the above query.

You can see in the above snippet that the Logical Name and File Name in the DB File Path column for ProductsDB are still reflecting the old name of CoreDB. This is not a good practice to follow in a Production Environment. Below you will see the steps which a DBA can follow to rename the database and its respective files.

Steps to Rename a SQL Server Database

DBAs should follow the below steps which will not only rename the database, but at the same time will also rename the Logical Name and File Name of the database.

This first set of commands put the database in single user mode and also modifies the logical names.


/* Set Database as a Single User */
ALTER DATABASE CoreDB SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
/* Change Logical File Name */
ALTER DATABASE [CoreDB] MODIFY FILE (NAME=N'CoreDB', NEWNAME=N'ProductsDB')
GO
ALTER DATABASE [CoreDB] MODIFY FILE (NAME=N'CoreDB_log', NEWNAME=N'ProductsDB_log')
GO

This is the output from the above code.


Now we need to detach the database, so we can rename the physical files.  If the database files are open you will not be able to rename the files.

/* Detach Current Database */
USE [master]
GO
EXEC master.dbo.sp_detach_db @dbname = N'CoreDB'
GO

Once the CoreDB database is detached successfully then the next step will be to rename the Physical Files. This can be done either manually or by using the xp_cmdshell system stored procedure. You can enable xp_cmdshell feature using the sp_configure system stored procedure.

USE master
GO
sp_configure 'show advanced options'
GO
/* 0 = Disabled , 1 = Enabled */
sp_configure 'xp_cmdshell', 1
GO
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

Once xp_cmdshell is enabled you can use the below script to rename the physical files of the database.

/* Rename Physical Files */
USE [master]
GO
EXEC xp_cmdshell 'RENAME "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL ServerMSSQL10.SQL2008\
MSSQL\DATA\CoreDB.mdf", "ProductsDB.mdf"'
GO
EXEC xp_cmdshell 'RENAME "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL ServerMSSQL10.SQL2008\
MSSQL\DATA\CoreDB_log.ldf", "ProductsDB_log.ldf"'
GO

Once the above step has successfully executed then the next step will be to attach the database, this can be done by executing the T-SQL below:

/* Attach Renamed ProductsDB Database Online */
USE [master]
GO
CREATE DATABASE ProductsDB ON
( FILENAME = N'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.SQL2008\MSSQL\DATA\ProductsDB.mdf' ),
( FILENAME = N'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.SQL2008\MSSQL\DATA\ProductsDB_log.ldf' )
FOR ATTACH
GO

Once the above step has successfully executed then the final step will be to allow multi user access for the user database by executing the below T-SQL:

/* Set Database to Multi User*/
ALTER DATABASE ProductsDB SET MULTI_USER
GO

You can verify the Logical and File Names for the ProductsDB database by executing the T-SQL below:

USE master
GO
/* Identify Database File Names */
SELECT
name AS [Logical Name],
physical_name AS [DB File Path],
type_desc AS [File Type],
state_desc AS [State]
FROM sys.master_files
WHERE database_id = DB_ID(N'ProductsDB')

 

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2012 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes. We have customers from around the globe, spread across every continent. We serve the hosting needs of the business and professional, government and nonprofit, entertainment and personal use market segments.



European SQL 2017 Hosting :: How To Call A Web Service From SQL Server?

clock April 24, 2019 11:27 by author Peter

In this blog, I have shown the process of calling web services through a stored procedure in SQL Server database. Also, I have explained how to call a stored procedure with a SOAP Envelope.

Step 1
Create a stored procedure in your SQL Server.
  CREATE proc [dbo].[spHTTPRequest]    
        @URI varchar(2000) = 'http://localhost:55253/',         
        @methodName varchar(50) = 'Get',    
        @requestBody varchar(8000) = '',    
        @SoapAction varchar(255),    
        @UserName nvarchar(100), -- Domain\UserName or UserName    
        @Password nvarchar(100),    
        @responseText varchar(8000) output   
  as   
  SET NOCOUNT ON   
  IF    @methodName = ''   
  BEGIN   
        select FailPoint = 'Method Name must be set'   
        return   
  END   
  set   @responseText = 'FAILED'   
  DECLARE @objectID int   
  DECLARE @hResult int   
  DECLARE @source varchar(255), @desc varchar(255)    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OACreate 'MSXML2.ServerXMLHTTP', @objectID OUT   
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
                    source = @source,    
                    description = @desc,    
                    FailPoint = 'Create failed',    
                    MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  -- open the destination URI with Specified method    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'open', null, @methodName, @URI, 'false', @UserName, @Password   
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'Open failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  -- set request headers    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'setRequestHeader', null, 'Content-Type', 'text/xml;charset=UTF-8'   
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'SetRequestHeader failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  -- set soap action    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'setRequestHeader', null, 'SOAPAction', @SoapAction    
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'SetRequestHeader failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  declare @len int   
  set @len = len(@requestBody)    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'setRequestHeader', null, 'Content-Length', @len    
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'SetRequestHeader failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  /*   
  -- if you have headers in a table called RequestHeader you can go through them with this   
  DECLARE @HeaderKey varchar(500), @HeaderValue varchar(500)   
  DECLARE RequestHeader CURSOR  
  LOCAL FAST_FORWARD   
  FOR  
        SELECT      HeaderKey, HeaderValue   
        FROM RequestHeaders   
        WHERE       Method = @methodName   
  OPEN RequestHeader   
  FETCH NEXT FROM RequestHeader   
  INTO @HeaderKey, @HeaderValue   
  WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0   
  BEGIN  
        --select @HeaderKey, @HeaderValue, @methodName   
        EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'setRequestHeader', null, @HeaderKey, @HeaderValue   
        IF @hResult <> 0   
        BEGIN  
              EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT  
              SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),   
                    source = @source,   
                    description = @desc,   
                    FailPoint = 'SetRequestHeader failed',   
                    MedthodName = @methodName   
              goto destroy   
              return  
        END  
        FETCH NEXT FROM RequestHeader   
        INTO @HeaderKey, @HeaderValue   
  END  
  CLOSE RequestHeader   
  DEALLOCATE RequestHeader   
  */    
  -- send the request    
  EXEC @hResult = sp_OAMethod @objectID, 'send', null, @requestBody    
  IF    @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'Send failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  declare @statusText varchar(1000), @status varchar(1000)    
  -- Get status text    
  exec sp_OAGetProperty @objectID, 'StatusText', @statusText out   
  exec sp_OAGetProperty @objectID, 'Status', @status out   
  select @status, @statusText, @methodName    
  -- Get response text    
  exec sp_OAGetProperty @objectID, 'responseText', @responseText out   
  IF @hResult <> 0    
  BEGIN   
        EXEC sp_OAGetErrorInfo @objectID, @source OUT, @desc OUT   
        SELECT      hResult = convert(varbinary(4), @hResult),    
              source = @source,    
              description = @desc,    
              FailPoint = 'ResponseText failed',    
              MedthodName = @methodName    
        goto destroy    
        return   
  END   
  destroy:    
        exec sp_OADestroy @objectID    
  SET NOCOUNT OFF   
      
  GO   


The Stored Procedure takes the following parameters.
  @URI: the URI of the web service
  @MethodName: this would be ‘GET’ or ‘POST’
  @RequestBody: this is the SOAP xml that you want to send
  @SoapAction: this the operation that you want to call on your service
  @UserName: NT UserName if your web service requires authentication
  @Password: the password if using NT Authentication on the web service
  @ResponseText: this is an out parameter that contains the response from the web service


Step 2
Make the setting in SQL for it.
  Use master 
  sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1  
   
  GO  
  RECONFIGURE;  
  GO  
  sp_configure 'Ole Automation Procedures', 1  
  GO  
  RECONFIGURE;  
  GO  
  sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1  
  GO  
  RECONFIGURE; 


Step 3

Call the stored procedure (Here is a sample call to my service).
  declare @xmlOut varchar(8000) 
  Declare @RequestText as varchar(8000); 
  set @RequestText= 
  '<soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/" xmlns:tem="http://tempuri.org/"> 
     <soapenv:Header/> 
     <soapenv:Body> 
        <tem:CreateOrder> 
           <!--Optional:--> 
           <tem:OrderRequest> 
              <tem:OrderId>200</tem:OrderId> 
              <!--Optional:--> 
              <tem:OrderName>something</tem:OrderName> 
           </tem:OrderRequest> 
        </tem:CreateOrder> 
     </soapenv:Body> 
  </soapenv:Envelope>' 
  exec spHTTPRequest 
  'http://localhost/testwebservices/helloworldservice.asmx', 
  'POST', 
  @RequestText, 
  'http://tempuri.org/CreateOrderForMe',   -- this is your SOAPAction: 
  '', '', @xmlOut out 
  select @xmlOut  


Make sure your SOAP action is correct. Copy this action from your services. It will show up when your service is RUN.

 



European SQL 2017 Hosting :: How to Create Registration Form in ASP.NET with SQL Server Database

clock March 19, 2019 11:25 by author Scott

In this post we will see how to create ASP.NET Registration form and save its data in MS SQL Database. It will be quite simple form with values like Employee Id, Employee name, Date of Birth, Country, State, City names and more. We will be also adding Profile Image of the user and saving it to ASP.NET Project’s folder to complete our Registration form data. So let’s see.

I’m also using AJAX to create this registration form in ASP.NET. You can add it to your project by using Visual Studio’s Nuget Manager Console.

First create a new ASP.NET web project in Visual studio. I’m using Visual studio 2017 to create this registration form for ASP.NET.

Now add a new ASPX form with name Registration.aspx and edit it as below:

Registration.aspx:

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Registration.aspx.cs"
Inherits="RegistrationForms.Registration" ValidateRequest="true"%>

<%@ Register Assembly="AjaxControlToolkit" Namespace="AjaxControlToolkit" TagPrefix="ajax" %>
<!DOCTYPE html>

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
<link href="css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<style>
.borderless td, .borderless th {
border: none;
border-color: Red;
}

.table-condensed > thead > tr > th, .table-condensed > tbody > tr > th, .table-condensed > tfoot > tr > th, .table-condensed > thead > tr > td, .table-condensed > tbody > tr > td, .table-condensed > tfoot > tr > td {
padding: 3px;
}

input, select {
border-radius: 3px;
padding: 1px;
border: 1px solid darkgray;
}

.btnCoral {
background-color: crimson;
color: #fff;
}

body {
/* Permalink - use to edit and share this gradient: http://colorzilla.com/gradient-editor/#1e5799+0,2989d8+50,207cca+51,7db9e8+100;Blue+Gloss+Default */
background: #1e5799; /* Old browsers */
background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #1e5799 0%, #2989d8 50%, #207cca 51%, #7db9e8 100%); /* FF3.6-15 */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #1e5799 0%,#2989d8 50%,#207cca 51%,#7db9e8 100%); /* Chrome10-25,Safari5.1-6 */
background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #1e5799 0%,#2989d8 50%,#207cca 51%,#7db9e8 100%); /* W3C, IE10+, FF16+, Chrome26+, Opera12+, Safari7+ */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#1e5799', endColorstr='#7db9e8',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */
}

.parent-container {
background-color: black;
width:70%;
}

.container {
background-color: white;
margin:2px;
width:auto;
}

</style>
<title>Registration Form</title>
</head>
<body>
<form id="form1" runat="server">
<asp:ScriptManager runat="server" />
<div class="parent-container">
<div class="container">
<table class="table-condensed borderless">
<tr>
<td align="center" colspan="2">
<h2 style="background-color: black; color: White; padding: 5px;">REGISTRATION FORM</h2>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">EMP Id:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtEmpId" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtEmpId" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red"
ValidateRequestMode="Enabled"/>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Name:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtName" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtName" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Date of Birth:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtDOB" />
<ajax:CalendarExtender runat="server" Format="yyyy-MM-dd" TargetControlID="txtDOB" />

<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtDOB" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Address:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtAddress" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtAddress" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Country:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="ddCountry"
AutoPostBack="true" OnSelectedIndexChanged="ddCountry_SelectedIndexChanged" /></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">State:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="ddState"
AutoPostBack="true" OnSelectedIndexChanged="ddState_SelectedIndexChanged" /></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">City:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="ddCity" /></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Pincode:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtPincode" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtPincode" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Date of Joining:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtDOJ" />
<ajax:CalendarExtender runat="server" Format="yyyy-MM-dd" TargetControlID="txtDOJ" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtDOJ" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Department:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="ddDepartment" /></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Role:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:DropDownList runat="server" ID="ddRole">

<asp:ListItem Text="USER" Value="USER" />
<asp:ListItem Text="ROLE" Value="ROLE" />

</asp:DropDownList></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Profile Pic:</td>
<td align="left" valign="middle">
<asp:FileUpload runat="server" ID="fileUpload" />
<asp:Button runat="server" Text="Upload" ID="btnUpload" OnClick="btnUpload_Click" />

<asp:Image ID="imgProfile" runat="server" Width="150px" Height="150px" />
</td>
</tr>

<tr>
<td align="right">Email ID:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtEmail" />
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtEmail" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
<asp:RegularExpressionValidator runat="server" ValidationExpression="\w+([-+.]\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*" ControlToValidate="txtEmail"
ErrorMessage="Email address invalid" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Password:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtpassword" TextMode="Password"/>
<asp:RequiredFieldValidator runat="server" ControlToValidate="txtpassword" ErrorMessage="*" ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td align="right">Confirm Password:</td>
<td align="left">
<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtConfirmPassword" TextMode="Password"/></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td colspan="20">
<asp:CompareValidator ID="comparePasswords"
runat="server"
ControlToCompare="txtpassword"
ControlToValidate="txtConfirmPassword"
ErrorMessage="Passwords do not match up."
ForeColor="Red" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td colspan="2" align="center">
<br />
<asp:Button runat="server" ID="btnSubmit" Text="Submit" OnClick="btnSubmit_Click"
CssClass="btn btnCoral" />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td colspan="2">
<asp:Label runat="server" ID="lblInfo" />
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</div>

</div>
</form>
</body>
</html>

 

Ajax’s Data picker is used to set Date of Birth and Date of Joining information of the employee to complete the registration process.

Profile picture will be saved inside “ProfileImages” folder.

 

And below is my code for the registration page:

using System;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Data;
using System.Configuration;
using System.IO;
using System.Web.UI;

namespace RegistrationForms
{
public partial class Registration : System.Web.UI.Page
{
SqlConnection con;
SqlCommand cmd;
SqlDataAdapter adapter;
SqlDataReader reader;
DataSet ds;
DataTable dt;

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
if (!IsPostBack)
{
LoadCountries();
LoadDepartment();
}
}

public void LoadDepartment()
{
try
{
con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["connectionstring"].ConnectionString);
cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from tblDepartments", con);
con.Open();
adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
dt = new DataTable();
adapter.Fill(dt);

if (dt.Rows.Count > 0)
{
DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
dr["DeptId"] = 0;
dr["Department"] = "Please select Department";
dt.Rows.InsertAt(dr, 0);

ddDepartment.DataSource = dt;
ddDepartment.DataTextField = "Department";
ddDepartment.DataValueField = "DeptId";
ddDepartment.DataBind();
}
adapter.Dispose();
cmd.Dispose();
con.Close();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
lblInfo.Text = ex.Message.ToString();
}
}
public void LoadCountries()
{
try
{
con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["connectionstring"].ConnectionString);
cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from tblCountries", con);
con.Open();
adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
dt = new DataTable();
adapter.Fill(dt);

if (dt.Rows.Count > 0)
{
DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
dr["CountryId"] = 0;
dr["Country"] = "Please select Country";
dt.Rows.InsertAt(dr, 0);


ddCountry.DataSource = dt;
ddCountry.DataTextField = "Country";
ddCountry.DataValueField = "CountryId";
ddCountry.SelectedIndex = 0;
ddCountry.DataBind();
}
adapter.Dispose();
cmd.Dispose();
con.Close();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
lblInfo.Text = ex.Message.ToString();
}

}
protected void btnSubmit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
try
{
if (Page.IsValid)
{

con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["connectionString"].ConnectionString);
cmd = new SqlCommand();
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
cmd.CommandText = "sp_AddUsers";
cmd.Connection = con;
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UserId", txtEmpId.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Name", txtName.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@DOB", txtDOB.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Address", txtAddress.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@City", ddCity.SelectedValue.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@State", ddState.SelectedValue.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Country", ddCountry.SelectedValue.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Pincode", txtPincode.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Department", ddDepartment.SelectedValue.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UserRole", ddRole.SelectedItem.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Passcode", txtpassword.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@DOJ", txtDOJ.Text.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ProfilePic", imgProfile.ImageUrl.ToString());
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@EmailId", txtEmail.Text.ToString());
con.Open();
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
cmd.Dispose();
con.Close();
ShowAlert("Success", "Saved Successfully");
ClearFeilds();
}
else
ShowAlert("Error", "Please enter all fields");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{

}
}

public void ShowAlert(String header, String message)
{
ScriptManager.RegisterStartupScript(this, GetType(), header, "alert('" + message + "');", true);
}

public void ClearFeilds()
{
txtAddress.Text = "";
txtConfirmPassword.Text = "";
txtDOB.Text = "";
txtDOJ.Text = "";
txtEmail.Text = "";
txtEmpId.Text = "";
txtName.Text = "";
txtpassword.Text = "";
txtPincode.Text = "";
LoadCountries();
}
protected void ddCountry_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
LoadState();
}

public void LoadState()
{
try
{
con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["connectionstring"].ConnectionString);
cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from tblStates where CountryId=@id", con);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", ddCountry.SelectedValue.ToString());
con.Open();
adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
dt = new DataTable();
adapter.Fill(dt);

if (dt.Rows.Count > 0)
{
DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
dr["StateId"] = 0;
dr["State"] = "Please select State";
dr["CountryId"] = "0";
dt.Rows.InsertAt(dr, 0);
ddState.Items.Clear();
ddState.ClearSelection();
ddState.DataSource = dt;
ddState.DataTextField = "State";
ddState.DataValueField = "StateId";
ddState.DataBind();
ddState.SelectedValue = null;
ddState.SelectedIndex = 0;
ddCity.Items.Clear();
ddCity.SelectedValue = null;
}
adapter.Dispose();
cmd.Dispose();
con.Close();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
}
}

protected void ddState_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
try
{
con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["connectionstring"].ConnectionString);
cmd = new SqlCommand("Select * from tblCities where Stateid=@id", con);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", ddState.SelectedValue.ToString());
con.Open();
adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
dt = new DataTable();
adapter.Fill(dt);

if (dt.Rows.Count > 0)
{
DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
dr["CityId"] = 0;
dr["City"] = "Please select City";
dr["StateId"] = "0";
dt.Rows.InsertAt(dr, 0);
ddCity.DataSource = null;
ddCity.DataSource = dt;
ddCity.DataTextField = "City";
ddCity.DataValueField = "CityId";
ddCity.DataBind();
ddCity.SelectedValue = null;
ddCity.SelectedIndex = 0;
}
adapter.Dispose();
cmd.Dispose();
con.Close();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
}
}

protected void btnUpload_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
try
{
if (fileUpload.HasFile)
{
string fileName = Path.GetFileName(fileUpload.PostedFile.FileName);
fileUpload.PostedFile.SaveAs(Server.MapPath("~/ProfileImages/") + fileName);
imgProfile.ImageUrl = "~/ProfileImages/" + fileName;
}
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
lblInfo.Text = "Image upload: " + ex.Message.ToString();
}
}
}
}

Below is the Database script (MS SQL Database):

--Create database [ESource]
USE [ESource]

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[tblStates](
[StateId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[State] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[CountryId] [int] NOT NULL
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[tblCities](
[CityId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[City] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[StateId] [int] NOT NULL
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[tblCountries](
[CountryId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Country] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[tblDepartments](
[DeptId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Department] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[tblUserDetails](
[EId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[EmailId] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[UserId] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
[Passcode] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[Name] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[DOB] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[Address] [nvarchar](max) NOT NULL,
[City] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[Pincode] [int] NOT NULL,
[State] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[Country] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[Department] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
[DOJ] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[ProfilePic] [nvarchar](max) NOT NULL,
[UserRole] [nvarchar](50)
)

CREATE procedure [dbo].[sp_AddUsers]
(
@UserId nvarchar(50),
@Passcode nvarchar(50),
@Name nvarchar(50),
@DOB datetime,
@Address nvarchar(max),
@City int,
@Pincode nvarchar(50),
@State int,
@Country int,
@Department int,
@DOJ datetime,
@ProfilePic nvarchar(max),
@UserRole nvarchar(50),
@EmailId nvarchar(50)
)
as begin
Insert into tblUserDetails
(UserId,Passcode,Name,DOB,Address,City,Pincode,State,Country,Department,DOJ,ProfilePic,UserRole,EmailId)
values
(@UserId,@Passcode,@Name,@DOB,@Address,@City,@Pincode,@State,@Country,@Department,@DOJ,@ProfilePic,@UserRole,@EmailId);
end
GO



SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Transfer Database From SQL Server 2008 To 2014

clock September 27, 2018 11:52 by author Peter

There are lots of companies that use Microsoft services for creating and editing databases and table records. It is one of the most sought-after technology when it comes to relational database management system. They keep upgrading their products to remove bugs and improve services. One may need to transfer database from SQL Server 2008 to 2014 to keep up with the latest requirements. It is better to have complete knowledge with respect to steps involved in performing the migration. There are different ways to perform this procedure without any data loss.

Different Ways to Transfer Database from SQL Server 2008 to 2014
Following is a snapshot of all the methods one can opt for when moving databases,

  • Transfer Database using Backup and Restore Option
  • First, archive the full database with all the instances.
  • Then, copy the backup to the target location.
  • Next, restore it on the destination Server specify the ‘WITH NORECOVERY’ option.
  • To migrate SQL Server 2008 database to 2014 by overwriting the pre-existing database, use the ‘WITH REPLACE’ option.

Move Database using Attach and Detach

  • First, detach the source Server by using the sp_detach_db stored procedure.
  • Then, copy the .mdf, .ldf and .ndf files to the destination computer.
  • Next, use the sp_attach_db stored procedure to attach the database to the target Server.
  • Browse to the location where the copied files are saved on the new machine.

Transfer using Import and Export Wizard
There is an inbuilt facility provided by Microsoft for SQL Server 2008 to 2014 migration. It is the Data Transformation Services Import and Export Data Wizard. It has the ability to transfer complete databases or selectively move objects to the destination database. It can be implemented by repeating the steps below:
First, go to SQL Server Management Studio on the source Server and select the database to export.
Then, right-click on it and go to Tasks >> Copy Database Wizard.
Now, select the source and destination credentials and choose appropriate settings.
Then, click Next or schedule SQL Server 2008 to 2014 migration for some other time.
Finally, click on the Execute button to implement the changes made.

Transfer SQL Server Scripts to Destination Server
First, launch the SQL Server Management Studio on the source server.

  • Then, select the database and right-click on it.
  • Then, go to Tasks >> Generate Scripts Wizard(GSW).
  • Next, select the appropriate choice from the multiple options available.
  • Make sure that the ‘script data = true’ is selected to move data as well.
  • Then, select Next >> Next >> Finish.
  • Next, connect to the Database Server and create a new database in it.
  • Then, select a ‘New Query’ button from the navigation bar and paste the scripts generated by the GSW.
  • Finally, execute them on the destination database.

It is a smarter decision to transfer database from SQL Server 2008 to 2014. It contributes towards organization’s growth and technology upgrade needs. There are far too many ways to perform this migration. It is not easy to understand and to implement them without any trouble. Even technical professionals can use some help now and again. This post discusses all the manual means to migrate SQL Server 2008 database to 2014. One can also go with SysTools SQL Server Database Migrator to transfer SQL Server database from one Server to another in a small down time in few clicks.

HostForLIFE.eu SQL 2014 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu revolutionized hosting with Plesk Control Panel, a Web-based interface that provides customers with 24x7 access to their server and site configuration tools. Plesk completes requests in seconds. It is included free with each hosting account. Renowned for its comprehensive functionality - beyond other hosting control panels - and ease of use, Plesk Control Panel is available only to HostForLIFE's customers. They
offer a highly redundant, carrier-class architecture, designed around the needs of shared hosting customers.

 



European Entity Framework Core 1.0 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Access SQL from Entity Framework Core

clock January 12, 2017 08:33 by author Scott

ORMs like Entity Framework have always been shrouded in a bit of controversy from SQL purists who aren't in control of the types of queries that these tools are building behind the scenes. While this is a perfectly valid stance to take, these same tools can often assist in getting things done much faster than tinkering with an endless chain of JOINs, sub-queries, etc.

But what if you want to know exactly what is going on behind the scenes? What SQL is being generated by Entity Framework? And is it efficient enough to suit your needs, or do you need to handle writing some yourself?

This post will cover a quick tip that will allow you to see the SQL behind the scenes and judge for yourself using Entity Framework Core.

How Did This Work Prior to Entity Framework Core?

Previously, you could use Reflection to create an ObjectQuery object and then call the ToTraceString()method to actually store the query results as seen below:

// Build a query using Entity Framework
var query = _context.Widgets.Where(w => w.IsReal && w.Id == 42); 
// Get the generated SQL
var sql = ((System.Data.Objects.ObjectQuery)query).ToTraceString(); 

And that's really it. The result of the ToTraceString() call will return a string variable containing the entire SQL query being executed.

Options for Entity Framework Core

The previous approach no longer works within the Entity Framework Core (EF7) world, so we have to resort to one of three options, which may vary depending on your needs:

  • Using Built-in or Custom Logging. Logging the executing query using your logger of choice or the built-in Logger in .NET Core as mentioned in this tutorial.
  • Using a Profiler. Using an SQL Profiler like MiniProfiler to monitor the executing query.
  • Using Crazy Reflection Code. You can implement some custom reflection code similar to the older approach to perform the same basic concept.

Since both of the first two options are fairly well documented, we will be focusing on the crazy reflection approach.

Getting Behind the Scenes in Entity Framework Core

Using the following snippets of code, which rely on Reflection to resolve information about the compiler, parser, database, and fields being targeted, we can use those things to reconstruct what is actually going on behind the scenes.

NOTE: Since this relies on Reflection, it may be subject to breaking in the future, especially with any API changes.

public class IQueryableExtensions 
{
    private static readonly FieldInfo QueryCompilerField =
    typeof(EntityQueryProvider).GetTypeInfo().DeclaredFields.First
    (x => x.Name == "_queryCompiler");

    private static readonly PropertyInfo NodeTypeProviderField =
    QueryCompilerTypeInfo.DeclaredProperties.Single(x => x.Name == "NodeTypeProvider");

    private static readonly MethodInfo CreateQueryParserMethod =
    QueryCompilerTypeInfo.DeclaredMethods.First(x => x.Name == "CreateQueryParser");

    private static readonly FieldInfo DataBaseField =
    QueryCompilerTypeInfo.DeclaredFields.Single(x => x.Name == "_database");

    private static readonly FieldInfo QueryCompilationContextFactoryField =
    typeof(Database).GetTypeInfo().DeclaredFields.Single
    (x => x.Name == "_queryCompilationContextFactory");

    public static string ToSql<TEntity>
    (this IQueryable<TEntity> query) where TEntity : class
    {
        if (!(query is EntityQueryable<TEntity>)
        && !(query is InternalDbSet<TEntity>))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Invalid query");
        }

        var queryCompiler = (IQueryCompiler)QueryCompilerField.GetValue(query.Provider);
        var nodeTypeProvider =
        (INodeTypeProvider)NodeTypeProviderField.GetValue(queryCompiler);
        var parser = (IQueryParser)CreateQueryParserMethod.Invoke
        (queryCompiler, new object[] { nodeTypeProvider });
        var queryModel = parser.GetParsedQuery(query.Expression);
        var database = DataBaseField.GetValue(queryCompiler);
        var queryCompilationContextFactory =
        (IQueryCompilationContextFactory)QueryCompilationContextFactoryField.GetValue(database);
        var queryCompilationContext = queryCompilationContextFactory.Create(false);
        var modelVisitor =
        (RelationalQueryModelVisitor)queryCompilationContext.CreateQueryModelVisitor();
        modelVisitor.CreateQueryExecutor<TEntity>(queryModel);
        var sql = modelVisitor.Queries.First().ToString();

        return sql;
    }
}

And as far as actual usage goes, you would simply call the ToSql() method to return your SQL query string:

// Build a query using Entity Framework
var query = _context.Widgets.Where(w => w.IsReal && w.Id == 42); 
// Get the generated SQL
var sql = query.ToSql(); 



SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Calculate Total Rows in SQL Server 2014

clock June 24, 2016 22:15 by author Anthony

In this tutorial, I will write an article about How to Calculate Total Rows Inserted per Second in SQL Server 2014. Ever expected to compute the quantity of columns embedded consistently, for each table in every database on a server? Alternately, have you ever expected to approve that all methods have quit keeping in touch with tables? These sorts of inquiries come up routinely for me. To help with this, I've composed the following script, which inspects metadata qualities utilizing sys.partitions. This system isn't as precise as running SELECT COUNT(*) FROM, however its much quicker.

Remember, since it’s just looking at row counts, its very little help on tables that have a considerable measure of update/delete  action. Yet it does what I need it to do, and I utilize it pretty frequently, so I thought I'd experience case any other individual can advantage from it as well.

/* Declare Parameters */

DECLARE @newBaseline BIT = 1 -- change to 0 when you don't want to replace the baseline, i.e. after initial run
  , @delay CHAR(8) = '00:00:30'; -- change as needed 
IF @newBaseline = 1
BEGIN
    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#baseline') IS NOT NULL
        DROP TABLE #baseline; 
    CREATE TABLE #baseline
    (
         database_name  SYSNAME
       , table_name     SYSNAME
       , table_rows     BIGINT
       , captureTime    DATETIME NULL
    );
END 

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#current') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE #current;
 CREATE TABLE #current
(
     database_name  SYSNAME
   , table_name     SYSNAME
   , table_rows     BIGINT
   , captureTime    DATETIME NULL
); 
IF @newBaseline = 1
BEGIN
    EXECUTE sp_MSforeachdb 'USE ?;
        INSERT INTO #baseline
        SELECT DB_NAME()
            , o.name As [tableName]
            , SUM(p.[rows]) As [rowCnt]
            , GETDATE() As [captureTime]
        FROM sys.indexes As i
        JOIN sys.partitions As p
            ON i.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
           AND i.index_id  = p.index_id
        JOIN sys.objects As o
            ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
        WHERE i.[type] = 1
        GROUP BY o.name;' 
    WAITFOR DELAY @delay;
END
 EXECUTE sp_MSforeachdb 'USE ?;
INSERT INTO #current
SELECT DB_NAME()
    , o.name As [tableName]
    , SUM(p.[rows]) As [rowCnt]
    , GETDATE() As [captureTime]
FROM sys.indexes As i
JOIN sys.partitions As p
    ON i.[object_id] = p.[object_id]
   AND i.index_id  = p.index_id
JOIN sys.objects As o
    ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id]
WHERE i.[type] = 1
GROUP BY o.name;' 
SELECT  c.*
      , c.table_rows - b.table_rows AS 'new_rows'
      , DATEDIFF(second, b.captureTime, c.captureTime) AS 'time_diff'
      , (c.table_rows - b.table_rows) / DATEDIFF(second, b.captureTime, c.captureTime) AS 'rows_per_sec'
FROM #baseline AS b
JOIN #current AS c
    ON b.table_name = c.table_name
   AND b.database_name = c.database_name
ORDER BY new_rows DESC;

 

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2014 Hosting
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SQL Server 2012 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: SQL Server 2012 Database Fixing

clock April 26, 2016 00:35 by author Anthony

In this article, we will see about fixed database roles in SQL Server. As the name suggests, fixed database roles cannot be removed or modified and performs specific administrative tasks as it has pre-defined set of permissions. You need to be very careful while assigning these roles and assign these roles only when there is a serious requirements. You can execute the sp_helpdbfixedrole system procedure to get the list of fixed database roles.

EXEC sp_helpdbfixedrole
GO

  • db_owner
  • db_accessadmin
  • db_securityadmin
  • db_ddladmin
  • db_backupoperator
  • db_datareader
  • db_datawriter
  • db_denydatareader
  • db_denydatawriter

You can navigate to Database Roles from Object Explorer –> Expand Databases Node –> Select Database –> Navigate to Security –> Roles –> Database Roles


db_owner

All the members of db_owner fixed database roles can perform all the maintenance activities and setting configurations. This role should not be given to regular users and should be assigned very carefully as it can perform almost all the operations in a database.

db_accessadmin

As the name suggests, all the members of db_accessadmin can handle access related issues. This role controls security, grants access, revokes access for logins to enter database. This role is rarely used as these operations are performed by DBAs as he has relevant fixed server role.

db_securityadmin

Members of db_securityadmin role manages all the permissions and security related activities. As database administrators usually manages security, permissions, role membership etc. so this role is hardly assigned and used. You should not assign this role to regular users.

db_ddladmin

If any member is assigned with db_ddladmin role then he can perform all DDL operations and can execute, create, drop and alter any objects. Normally this role is assigned to developers to perform the related operations in application. This role is usually not assigned to regular users as he can misuse the DDL operations.

db_backupoperator

db_backupoperator role can perform the database backup operations. This role is rarely used as backup activity is a role of database administrator and he has much higher permissions rather than using this specific fixed database role.

db_datareader

If any user is requesting for SELECT permission on database tables then you can tag him with db_datareader fixed database role as this role allows a member to perform SELECT operations on database tables and views and tagged member will not be able to modify any object. This role is mostly assigned to developers and regular users who need table access on production database.

db_datawriter

All the members of db_datawriter fixed database role can perform INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE operations on all tables and views in respective database. This role is basically assigned to developers to perform operations on QA servers. Testing applications sometimes require this role.

db_denydatareader

As the name suggests this role doesn’t allow to read data from tables in a database. So user will not be able to perform SELECT operations on a table or views. I haven’t used this role any time and also never seen members assigned with this role.

db_denydatawriter

This role is basically opposing db_datawriter role which means members with this role will not be able to perform INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE operations on tables and views. Again as a DBA I have not used this role yet and never seen anyone using this role.

 


HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2012 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes. We have customers from around the globe, spread across every continent. We serve the hosting needs of the business and professional, government and nonprofit, entertainment and personal use market segments.

 



SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Make Stored Procedure in SQL Server 2014?

clock April 14, 2016 21:10 by author Anthony

In this tutorial I will show you Stored Procedure usage with step by step. First of All, you have good knowledge about SQL Server  after that, you will understand as well. Basically, Stored Procedure which is used in SQL Server, SQL Server is the product of Microsoft. Stored Procedure is mostly used with Insert, Update and Delete Data in Your Tables. If you make a table and insert update and delete record a records you have used insert update and delete query simply  again and again but Stored Procedure different. Stored Procedure you make a one time simply after that you don’t use long insert update and delete query. Stored Procedure is very helpful to make a Web Application or Desktop Application with the help of ASP.NET.

How to Make a Stored Procedure

First of All, you make a table, for example, I have made a Table namely Employee and I have inserted five columns ID_Number, Name_in_Full, Designation and Salary in my table you are see below with query and screenshot.
Make a Table in SQL Server
create table employee
(
ID_Number int primary key identity(1,1),
Name_in_Full varchar(50),
Employee_Number varchar(50),
Designation varchar(50),
Salary int
)


Create-a-Table-in-SQL-Server

I have made a table  with you can see table query and display screen shot, after that I have inserted data in a table.
Insert into employee values
(‘Asif Ali’, ‘5050’, ‘Web Developer’, 250000),
(‘Aamir Ali’, ‘5051’, ‘Businessman’, 250000),
(‘Asadullah’, ‘5052’, ‘Network Engineer’, 150000),
(‘Sameer Ali’, ‘5053’, ‘Accountant’, 450000)

I have made the table and insert a record in the table.


Create Stored Procedure in SQL Server

 

I have made a Stored Procedure namely CreateProc and I have used same column name with I have already used in a table below you can see complete query and screenshot. 

create procedure createProc
(@Name_in_Full varchar(50),
@Employee_Number varchar(50),
@Designation varchar(50),
@Salary int)
as
begin
insert into employee values(@Name_in_Full, @Employee_Number, @Designation, @Salary)
end


After that I have made complete Stored Procedure after that I have inserted a data in Table via Stored Procedure, complete query and screen shot as below.

execute createProc ‘Sadam’, ‘50504’, ‘Chemical Engineer’, 25000

Afer Run above query my data is inserted in my table with the help of SP


Alter Stored Procedure in SQL Server

After that I have changed with column data type I have used with Alter Query and change my column DataType, the complete query, and screen shot as below.

alter procedure createProc(@Name_in_Full varchar(50),@Employee_Number nvarchar(50),
@Designation varchar(50),@Salary int)
as
begin
insert into employee values(@Name_in_Full, @Employee_Number, @Designation, @Salary)
end

Alter Stored Procedure in SQL Server

After that, I have made UpdateProcedure which is used with an update a record with your table with the help of SP, the query and screenshot as below.

Update Stored Procedure in SQL Server

create procedure updateProc
(@ID_Number int,
@Name_in_Full varchar(50),
@Employee_Number nvarchar(50),
@Designation varchar(50),
@Salary int)
as
begin
update employee set Name_in_Full=@Name_in_Full,
Employee_Number=@Employee_Number,
Designation=@Designation, Salary=@Salary where ID_Number=@ID_Number
end

After that, I have update a Record with Table with the help of SP, the complete query, and screenshot as below.

exec updateProc 5, ‘Sadam Hussain’, ‘50504’, ‘Chemical Engineer’, 250000

 

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2014 Hosting
HostForLIFE.eu revolutionized hosting with Plesk Control Panel, a Web-based interface that provides customers with 24x7 access to their server and site configuration tools. Plesk completes requests in seconds. It is included free with each hosting account. Renowned for its comprehensive functionality - beyond other hosting control panels - and ease of use, Plesk Control Panel is available only to HostForLIFE's customers. They
offer a highly redundant, carrier-class architecture, designed around the needs of shared hosting customers.



About HostForLIFE.eu

HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

We have offered the latest Windows 2016 Hosting, ASP.NET Core 2.2.1 Hosting, ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting and SQL 2017 Hosting.


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