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SQL Server 2016 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Use THROW to Handle Error in SQL Server

clock June 29, 2015 06:03 by author Rebecca

Today, I'm gonna talk about how to handle error in SQL Server using THROW. In versions prior to SQL Server 2012, you can use @@RAISE_ERROR to generate error messages dynamically or using the sys.messages catalog.

Consider the following example:

SELECT ROUND(800.0, -3)

On executing this statement, you get the following error:

This error is caused by the value does not fit into the decimal data type.

You can use @@RAISERROR to raise a message:

BEGIN TRY
SELECT ROUND(800.0, -3)
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
DECLARE @ErrorMsg nvarchar(1000), @Severity int
SELECT @ErrorMsg = ERROR_MESSAGE(),
@Severity = ERROR_SEVERITY()
RAISERROR (@ErrorMsg, @Severity, 1)
END CATCH

Note: The old syntax of RAISERROR syntax specifying the error number and message number got deprecated (RAISEERROR 50005 ‘Exception Occurred’). Instead the new syntax RAISEERROR(50005, 10, 1) allowed you to specify the messageid, severity and state). For new applications use THROW.

However in SQL Server 2012 and above, there’s a better way to this without much efforts, using THROW. Consider the following code:

BEGIN TRY
SELECT ROUND(800.0, -3)
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
THROW
END CATCH

As you can see, with just one word THROW, we were able to handle the error with grace and get a result too.

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SQL Server 2016 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Detect a Table Has A Primary Key or Foreign Key

clock June 25, 2015 05:46 by author Rebecca

If you want to know if a table has a primary key or foreign key, you can find out this in many ways. Just follow these steps on this tutorial.

Step 1

First, let us create these a table using code below:

CREATE TABLE product_master
(
prod_id INT PRIMARY KEY,
prod_name VARCHAR(100),
price DECIMAL(12,2)
)
GO
CREATE TABLE product_details
(
prod_id INT,
sales_date DATETIME,
sales_qty INT,
sales_amount DECIMAL(16,2)
)
GO
CREATE TABLE company_master
(
compnay_id INT,
company_name VARCHAR(100),
address VARCHAR(1000)
)
GO

Step 2

Now, let us create foreign key:

ALTER TABLE product_details ADD CONSTRAINT ck_item FOREIGN KEY(prod_id) REFERENCES product_master(prod_id)

Step 3

If you want to check if a table has a primary key, you can use the following methods:

1. Use sp_pkeys system stored procedure

The result will be:

 

 

2. Use Objectproperty function

SELECT
*
FROM
INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE
OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_NAME),'TABLEHASPRIMARYKEY')=1 AND
TABLE_TYPE='BASE TABLE'
ORDER BY
TABLE_NAME

Step 4

If you want to check if a table has a foreign key, you can use the following method:

SELECT
*
FROM
INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE
OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_NAME),'TABLEHASFOREIGNKEY')=1 AND
TABLE_TYPE='BASE TABLE'
ORDER BY
TABLE_NAME

And the result is:

Step 5

If you want to check for the tables that do not have primary key or foreign key, you can use the following method:

SELECT
*
FROM
INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE
OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_NAME),'TABLEHASPRIMARYKEY')=0 AND
OBJECTPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_NAME),'TABLEHASFOREIGNKEY')=0 AND
TABLE_TYPE='BASE TABLE'
ORDER BY
TABLE_NAME

This is the result:

Easy right?

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SQL Server 2016 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Automate Restore All Transaction log Backup Files ?

clock June 23, 2015 08:13 by author Peter

On one of my servers we had to recover ten databases using last night's full backup and all subsequent log backups. Therefore within the middle of the night it had been about to be huge challenge to manually choose each log backup file to restore. So wrote this script to create commands to restore log backup files which can be then run in an exceedingly query window. Please follow the steps below to use the script.

1. Set the database name to the variable @dbname
2. Copy all the transaction log backups to a new directory. You'll prefer to begin copying the files. That  were taken a couple of minutes before the full backup was taken. You'll choose to copy the last file you wish to be restored based on the recovery point of your time.
3.  In the following line set the directory where you copied the log backup files to.

insert into #dir
exec xp_cmdshell 'dir "C:\Backup\Adventure*.trn" /b'

4. The below code will set the directory to where the log backup files have been copied.
SET @cmd='use master; RESTORE LOG ['[email protected]+'] FROM  DISK =
    N''C:\Backup\'[email protected]+''' WITH  FILE = 1,  NORECOVERY,  NOUNLOAD,  STATS = 10'
select (@cmd)

5. Now, Copy the output which should have the RESTORE commands and run them in a new query window.
6. Run the following command to bring the database out of restoring state.

RESTORE DATABASE dbname WITH RECOVERY


############################################################################
use master
set nocount on
DECLARE @filename varchar(2000), @cmd varchar(8000), @dbname varchar(100)

-----------------------Enter the Database name in the next line
SET @dbname='New'

IF  EXISTS (SELECT name FROM tempdb.sys.tables WHERE name like '#dir%')
begin
   DROP table #dir
end
create table #dir (filename varchar(1000))

-----------------------Enter the path to TRN File in the xp_cmdshell line
insert into #dir
exec xp_cmdshell 'dir "C:\Backup\Adventure*.trn" /b'

delete from #dir where filename is null
DECLARE filecursor CURSOR FOR
select * from #dir order by filename asc

OPEN filecursor
FETCH NEXT FROM filecursor INTO @filename

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
 SET @cmd='use master; RESTORE LOG ['[email protected]+'] FROM  DISK = N''C:\Backup\'[email protected]+''' WITH  FILE = 1,  NORECOVERY,  NOUNLOAD,  STATS = 10'
 print @cmd
FETCH NEXT FROM filecursor INTO @filename
END
CLOSE filecursor 
DEALLOCATE filecursor
drop table #dir

############################################################################

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SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Get CONSTRAINT of Database or Table

clock June 22, 2015 05:51 by author Rebecca

In this post, I am going to explain how you can list all CONSTRAINT of database or table in SQl Server. When you are working on database sometimes you need to check or get the CONSTRAINT on database or table. Using below given query we can get the CONSTRAINT of table or database quickly.

Step 1

Query to list all fields of sys.objects:
SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE type_desc LIKE '%CONSTRAINT'
Using above query we get all fields of sys.objects.

Step 2

To get only Constraint name, tabe name and Constraint type I use the refined query mention below:
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS ConstraintName,
SCHEMA_NAME(schema_id) AS SchemaName,
OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id) AS TableName,
type_desc AS ConstraintType
FROM sys.objects
WHERE type_desc LIKE '%CONSTRAINT'

Step 3

To get the Constraint detail of a particular table use the below given query:
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(object_id) AS ConstraintName,
SCHEMA_NAME(schema_id) AS SchemaName,
type_desc AS ConstraintType
FROM sys.objects
WHERE type_desc LIKE '%CONSTRAINT' AND OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id)='Student_Register'

The last, replace the Student_Register with your database table name.

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SQL Server 2016 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Save Picture in SQL Server with ASP.NET ?

clock June 18, 2015 07:18 by author Peter

This article will explains the way to Save pictures In Sqlserver database In Asp.Net using File upload control. I am upload the pictures using FileUpload control and saving or storing them in SQL Server database in ASP.NET with C# and VB.NET.

Database has a table named pictures with 3 columns:
1. ID Numeric Primary key with Identity Increment.
2. ImageName Varchar to store Name of picture.
3. Image column to store image in binary format.

After uploading and saving pictures in database, pics are displayed in GridView. And here is the HTML markup:
<form id="form1" runat="server">
<div>
<asp:TextBox ID="txtName" runat="server" Width="95px">
</asp:TextBox>
<asp:FileUpload ID="FileUpload1" runat="server"/>
<asp:Label ID="lblMessage" runat="server">
</asp:Label>
<asp:Button ID="btnUpload" runat="server"
            OnClick="btnUpload_Click" Text="Upload"/>
</div>
</form>

Now, write the following code in Click Event of Upload Button:
protected void btnUpload_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
 string strImageName = txtName.Text.ToString();
 if (FileUpload1.PostedFile != null &&
     FileUpload1.PostedFile.FileName != "")
  {
   byte[] imageSize = new byte
                 [FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength];
  HttpPostedFile uploadedImage = FileUpload1.PostedFile;
  uploadedImage.InputStream.Read
     (imageSize, 0, (int)FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength);

 // Create SQL Connection
  SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection();
  con.ConnectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings
                         ["ConnectionString"].ConnectionString;

 // Create SQL Command

 SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();
 cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Images(ImageName,Image)" +
                   " VALUES (@ImageName,@Image)";
 cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
 cmd.Connection = con;

 SqlParameter ImageName = new SqlParameter
                     ("@ImageName", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50);
 ImageName.Value = strImageName.ToString();
 cmd.Parameters.Add(ImageName);

 SqlParameter UploadedImage = new SqlParameter
               ("@Image", SqlDbType.Image, imageSize.Length);
 UploadedImage.Value = imageSize;
 cmd.Parameters.Add(UploadedImage);
 con.Open();
 int result = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
 con.Close();
 if (result > 0)
 lblMessage.Text = "File Uploaded";
 GridView1.DataBind();
 }
}


VB.NET Code

Protected Sub btnUpload_Click
(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As EventArgs)

    Dim strImageName As String = txtName.Text.ToString()
    If FileUpload1.PostedFile IsNot Nothing AndAlso
       FileUpload1.PostedFile.FileName <> "" Then

        Dim imageSize As Byte() = New Byte
          (FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength - 1) {}

        Dim uploadedImage__1 As HttpPostedFile =
                                 FileUpload1.PostedFile

        uploadedImage__1.InputStream.Read(imageSize, 0,
              CInt(FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength))
       
        ' Create SQL Connection
        Dim con As New SqlConnection()
        con.ConnectionString =
                 ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings
                  ("ConnectionString").ConnectionString
       
        ' Create SQL Command
       
        Dim cmd As New SqlCommand()
        cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Images
           (ImageName,Image) VALUES (@ImageName,@Image)"
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text
        cmd.Connection = con
       
        Dim ImageName As New SqlParameter
                  ("@ImageName", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50)
        ImageName.Value = strImageName.ToString()
        cmd.Parameters.Add(ImageName)
       
        Dim UploadedImage__2 As New SqlParameter
            ("@Image", SqlDbType.Image, imageSize.Length)
        UploadedImage__2.Value = imageSize
        cmd.Parameters.Add(UploadedImage__2)
        con.Open()
        Dim result As Integer = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery()
        con.Close()
        If result > 0 Then
            lblMessage.Text = "File Uploaded"
        End If
        GridView1.DataBind()
    End If
End Sub

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SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Use DELETE Statement to Remove Rows

clock June 12, 2015 08:31 by author Rebecca

Sometimes, you may want to delete rows because they are no longer needed, or they were incorrectly added in the first place. The DELETE statement is used to remove rows from a SQL Server table. A single DELETE statement can remove a single row, or number of rows. In this article, I will explore how to remove rows from a table using the DELETE statement.

Here is the basic syntax of the DELETE statement:

DELETE
[ TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] ]
[ FROM ] <object>
[ <OUTPUT Clause> ]
[ WHERE <search_condition>]


( expression ) - is a number or an expression that equates to a number used to limit the number of rows deleted.

<object> - is the name of an object in a database from which you want to delete records

<OUTPUT Clause> - identifies the column values of the deleted rows to be returned from the DELETE statement

<search_condition>
- the condition used to identify the rows to be deleted

In order to demonstrate how to use the DELETE statement I will be creating a DemoDelete table. Here is the code I used to create and populate my DemoDelete table.

USE tempdb;
GO
CREATE TABLE DemoDelete (ID int,
DeleteDesc varchar(100));
GO
INSERT INTO DemoDelete VALUES
(1,'Thing One'),
(2,'Thing Two'),
(3, 'The Cat'),
(4, 'Sally'),
(5, 'The Brother'),
(6, 'The Mother'),
(7, 'The Fish');

Deleting a Single Row Using WHERE Constraint

In order to delete a single row from a table you need to identify that row with a WHERE constraint. Below is some code that deletes a single row from my DemoDelete table:

DELETE FROM DemoDelete
WHERE DeleteDesc = 'The Mother';

In this code I used the DeleteDesc column to constrain the records that I would be deleting. By specifying that the DeleteDesc column value had to be equal to the value "The Mother", only one record in my table got deleted, because only one row in my table had that value. Now if my table contained a number of rows that had a column value of "The Mother" then all the rows that contained that value would be deleted.

If you are unsure of the rows you are identifying to be deleted using the above example, and you want to make sure the rows you have targeted with the WHERE constraint are correct, then you can first run a SELECT statement. After you are confident that your SELECT statement is selecting the rows you want to delete you can then convert it to a DELETE statement.

Using the TOP Clause to Delete a Single Row

You can also use the TOP clause to delete a single row. Below is an example where I used the TOP clause to delete one row from my DemoDelete table:

DELETE TOP (1) FROM DemoDelete;

This statement deleted a random row from my DemoDelete table. It was random because SQL Server does not guarantee a sorted set will be returned where it can delete the top record of the ordered set. When I review the records left in my table I see I deleted the record that had an Id value of 1 and a DeleteDesc of "Thing One". Note if I change the TOP clause to another number like 3, then this statement would delete the number of rows equal to the value specified.

Deleting the TOP 1 Records from a Sorted Set

If you want to delete the first record from a sorted set you need to write your TSQL DELETE statement similar to the following code:

DELETE TOP (1) FROM DemoDelete
WHERE ID in
(SELECT TOP (1) ID FROM DemoDelete
ORDER BY ID DESC);

In the above code I create a subquery that returned a single ID value based on the descending sort order of ID column value in my DemoDelete table. I then used the WHERE constraint to only delete records that had that ID value. I also place a TOP (1) clause on my DELETE statement to only delete a single row should my DemoDelete table contain multiple records with the same ID value. If you are following along you can see the above code deleted the DemoDelete record that had an ID value of 7.

Since my DemoDelete table did not contain multiple records with the same ID value I could have also deleted the largest ID value row by running the following code:

DELETE FROM DemoDelete
WHERE ID in
(SELECT TOP (1) ID FROM DemoDelete
ORDER BY ID DESC);

When I run this code against my DemoDelete table it will delete ID value of 5.

Using Another Table to Identify the Rows to Delete and the OUTPUT Clause

There are times when you might what to delete the rows in a table based on values from another table. An example of where you might want to do this is to remove rows from your inventory table based on some sales data. To demo this first I will need to generate another table that contains key values for the rows I want to delete. Here is the code to create and populate my other table:

CREATE TABLE RecordsToDelete (
DeleteDesc varchar(100));
GO
INSERT INTO RecordsToDelete VALUES
('Thing Two'),
('Sally');


At this point after running all my different DELETE statements against my DemoDelete table there are only three rows left in my table. By selecting all the rows in my DemoDelete table I see that these three rows are left:

ID DeleteDesc
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2 Thing Two
3 The Cat
4 Sally

In order to use the RecordsToDelete table to delete specific records in my DemoDelete table I need to run the code below:

DELETE FROM DemoDelete
OUTPUT DELETED.*
FROM DemoDelete INNER JOIN RecordsToDelete
on DemoDelete.DeleteDesc = RecordsToDelete.DeleteDesc;

This code joins the table DemoDelete and RecordsToDelete based on the DeleteDesc column. When the DeleteDesc matches between the two tables the matched rows within the DemoDelete table are deleted.

My delete statement above also contains the OUTPUT clause. The OUTPUT clause is used to return the column values of the deleted rows that are identified in the OUTPUT clause. In the code above I specified "DELETED.*". The "*" means to return all the columns values from the DELETED rows. When I ran this code the following rows were returned:

ID DeleteDesc
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -
2 Thing Two
4 Sally

These returned rows could be used by your application for some purpose, like creating an audit trail.

Inserting OUTPUT Clause Data into a Table

There are times when you might retain the data created by the OUTPUT clause in a table instead of just returning the deleted row values to the application. To demonstrate running a DELETE statement that populates the row values being deleted into a table I will run the code below:

DECLARE @DeletedRows TABLE
(ID INT, DeleteDesc varchar(100));
DELETE FROM DemoDelete
OUTPUT DELETED.ID, DELETED.DeleteDesc
INTO @DeletedRows
WHERE DeleteDesc = 'The Cat';
SELECT * FROM @DeletedRows;


In this code sample I first created a table to contain my deleted rows. This table is a table variable name @DeletedRows. Next I ran my DELETE statement. This time my DELETE statement specified the deleted row output was to go into my table variable. That specification was made using the INTO clause of the DELETE statement.

The following output displayed the SELECT statement in the above code snippet:

ID DeleteDesc
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -
3 The Cat

In both of my examples that used the OUTPUT clause of the DELETE statement I specified "DELETED.*" to denote outputting all the column values for the rows being deleted. I could have specified the actual column values I wanted to output. The code below is equivalent to the code above.

DECLARE @DeletedRows TABLE
(ID INT, DeleteDesc varchar(100));
DELETE FROM DemoDelete
OUTPUT DELETED.ID, DELETED.DeleteDesc
INTO @DeletedRows
WHERE DeleteDesc = 'The Cat';
SELECT * FROM @DeletedRows;

In this code you can see I specified "DELETED.ID, DELETED.DeleteDesc", instead of "DELETE.*". You can verify this code is equivalent by inserting the "The Cat" row back into the DemoDelete table and then running the code above.

As you can see there are multiple ways to delete rows from a SQL Server table. You can use the WHERE clause to identify specific criteria for the rows that need to be deleted. You can join a table to the table in which you are deleting rows to identify which rows to delete. You can even use the TOP clause to restrict the number of rows that will be deleted. The article should help you with developing your DELETE statement next time you have to remove some rows from a SQL Server table.

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SQL Server 2014 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Create Country Table and Populate With All Countries

clock June 9, 2015 08:29 by author Peter

In this article, I will tell you a SQL Script to Create Country table and populate with all countries. In this case, we either use a text box where user enters the country name or provide user with a drop down list of all countries. To create the dropdown, it is advised to store country names in a database table. Write the following code:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Country]( 
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, 
[CountryName] [nvarchar](100) NOT NULL 
) ON [PRIMARY] 
 
GO 
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [dbo].[Country] ON 
 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Afghanistan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Albania') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Algeria') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'American Samoa') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Andorra') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Angola') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Anguilla') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Antarctica') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Antigua And Barbuda') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Argentina') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Armenia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Aruba') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Australia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Austria') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Azerbaijan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bahamas') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bahrain') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bangladesh') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Barbados') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Belarus') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Belgium') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Belize') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Benin') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bermuda') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bhutan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bolivia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bosnia And Herzegowina') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Botswana') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bouvet Island') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Brazil') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'British Indian Ocean Territory') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Brunei Darussalam') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Bulgaria') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Burkina Faso') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Burundi') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cambodia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cameroon') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Canada') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cape Verde') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cayman Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Central African Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Chad') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Chile') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'China') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Christmas Island') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cocos (Keeling) Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Colombia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Comoros') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Congo') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cook Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Costa Rica') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cote D''Ivoire') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Croatia (Local Name: Hrvatska)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cuba') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Cyprus') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Czech Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Denmark') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Djibouti') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Dominica') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Dominican Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'East Timor') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Ecuador') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Egypt') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'El Salvador') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Equatorial Guinea') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Eritrea') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Estonia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Ethiopia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Falkland Islands (Malvinas)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Faroe Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Fiji') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Finland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'France') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'French Guiana') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'French Polynesia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'French Southern Territories') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Gabon') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Gambia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Georgia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Germany') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Ghana') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Gibraltar') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Greece') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Greenland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Grenada') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guadeloupe') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guam') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guatemala') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guinea') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guinea-Bissau') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Guyana') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Haiti') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Heard And Mc Donald Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Holy See (Vatican City State)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Honduras') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Hong Kong') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Hungary') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Iceland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'India') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Indonesia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Iran (Islamic Republic Of)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Iraq') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Ireland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Israel') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Italy') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Jamaica') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Japan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Jordan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Kazakhstan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Kenya') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Kiribati') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Korea, Dem People''S Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Korea, Republic Of') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Kuwait') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Kyrgyzstan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Lao People''S Dem Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Latvia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Lebanon') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Lesotho') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Liberia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Libyan Arab Jamahiriya') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Liechtenstein') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Lithuania') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Luxembourg') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Macau') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Macedonia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Madagascar') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Malawi') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Malaysia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Maldives') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mali') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Malta') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Marshall Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Martinique') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mauritania') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mauritius') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mayotte') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mexico') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Micronesia, Federated States') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Moldova, Republic Of') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Monaco') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mongolia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Montserrat') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Morocco') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Mozambique') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Myanmar') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Namibia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Nauru') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Nepal') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Netherlands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Netherlands Ant Illes') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'New Caledonia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'New Zealand') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Nicaragua') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Niger') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Nigeria') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Niue') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Norfolk Island') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Northern Mariana Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Norway') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Oman') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Pakistan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Palau') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Panama') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Papua New Guinea') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Paraguay') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Peru') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Philippines') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Pitcairn') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Poland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Portugal') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Puerto Rico') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Qatar') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Reunion') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Romania') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Russian Federation') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Rwanda') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Saint K Itts And Nevis') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Saint Lucia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Saint Vincent, The Grenadines') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Samoa') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'San Marino') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sao Tome And Principe') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Saudi Arabia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Senegal') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Seychelles') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sierra Leone') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Singapore') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Slovakia (Slovak Republic)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Slovenia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Solomon Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Somalia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'South Africa') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'South Georgia , S Sandwich Is.') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Spain') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sri Lanka') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'St. Helena') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'St. Pierre And Miquelon') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sudan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Suriname') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Svalbard, Jan Mayen Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sw Aziland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Sweden') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Switzerland') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Syrian Arab Republic') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Taiwan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tajikistan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tanzania, United Republic Of') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Thailand') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Togo') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tokelau') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tonga') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Trinidad And Tobago') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tunisia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Turkey') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Turkmenistan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Turks And Caicos Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Tuvalu') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Uganda') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Ukraine') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'United Arab Emirates') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'United Kingdom') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'United States') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'United States Minor Is.') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Uruguay') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Uzbekistan') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Vanuatu') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Venezuela') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Viet Nam') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Virgin Islands (British)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Virgin Islands (U.S.)') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Wallis And Futuna Islands') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Western Sahara') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Yemen') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Yugoslavia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Zaire') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Zambia') 
GO 
INSERT [dbo].[Country] ([CountryName]) VALUES (N'Zimbabwe') 
GO 
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [dbo].[Country] OFF 
GO 



SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Use T-SQL to Find Weak Password

clock June 5, 2015 06:34 by author Rebecca

Recently one of our costumer emailed us below question:

Hi Hostforlife,
Need your urgent help. In recent past, we have been attacked by the hacker who was able to get in to our SQL Server via sysadmin account and made big damage to our data. To make sure it doesn’t happen in future, I have taken task to find out SQL Server password which are weak.
Do you have any suggestions for me?

This is one of the area which is always haunting all SQL DBAs. There are recommendations to use Windows Authentication to connect to SQL Server and that would save from all such problem. But it is not always feasible to use Windows Authentication. Now, if you decided to choose SQL Authentication, there is a setting which is “Enforce Password Policy” which would ensure that you are choosing a strong password.

If recommendations are not followed, you might end up in situation where SQL Logins have weak and basic passwords. SQL Server has provided a function PWDCOMPARE which can become very useful to find known password. Below are few example use of this out of box funtion:

SELECT NAME,
NAME 'password'
FROM   sys.sql_logins
WHERE  Pwdcompare(NAME, password_hash) = 1
UNION
SELECT NAME,
'<blank>' AS 'password'
FROM   sys.sql_logins
WHERE  Pwdcompare('', password_hash) = 1
UNION
SELECT NAME,
'password123' AS 'password'
FROM   sys.sql_logins
WHERE  Pwdcompare('password123', password_hash) = 1

In above query, we are trying to find:

  •     Password same as user name – first query
  •     Blank password – second query
  •     Password = password123 – third query

These are one of the most common password used in the industry. I am sure you can extend this further by modifying it and adding more weak passwords.

Here is the sample output for the above:

Hope this article would help you in finding weak passwords and make it more complex.

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting
Try our SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting today and your account will be setup soon! You can also take advantage of our Windows & ASP.NET Hosting support with Unlimited Domain, Unlimited Bandwidth, Unlimited Disk Space, etc.

 



SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting - HostForLife.eu :: How to Return More Than One Table from Store Procedure in MSSQL Server?

clock June 4, 2015 08:12 by author Peter

In this post, I will tell you about how to return more than one table from store procedure in SQL Server 2014. Return a single table full of data from store procedure we are able to use a DataTable however to come back multiple tables from store procedure we've got to use DataSet. DataSet could be a bunch of DataTables. so the following code you'll use to return single table. SqlCommand

 

cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Login", con);
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
cmd.Parameters.Add("@Email", SqlDbType.NVarChar).Value = email;
cmd.Parameters.Add("@Password", SqlDbType.NVarChar).Value = password;
cmd.Connection = con;
if (con.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
{
   con.Open();
}
SqlDataReader dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
DataTable dt = new DataTable();
dt.Load(dr);
return dt;


Now write the store procedure like the following code:
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_Test
    @Email nvarchar(255)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    select * from <tblName> whhere email = @Email
END


And then, It’s time to found how to get multiple table value in one DataSet. Write the code below:
CREATE PROCEDURE sp_Test
AS
BEGIN   
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    select * from Tbl1
    select * from Tbl2
    select * from Tbl3
    select * from Tbl4
END


And here is the C# code:
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_test", con);
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
cmd.Connection = con;
if (con.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
{   
con.Open();
}
SqlDataAdapter sda = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
DataSet ds = new DataSet();
sda.Fill(ds);
con.Close();
// Retrieving total stored tables from DataSet.             
DataTable dt1 = ds.Tables[0];
DataTable dt1 = ds.Tables[1];
DataTable dt1 = ds.Tables[2];
DataTable dt1 = ds.Tables[3];

I hope it works for you!

 

HostForLIFE.eu SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting

Try our SQL Server 2014 with Free ASP.NET Hosting today and your account will be setup soon! You can also take advantage of our Windows & ASP.NET Hosting support with Unlimited Domain, Unlimited Bandwidth, Unlimited Disk Space, etc.

 



HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches Drupal 7.37 Hosting

clock June 1, 2015 09:35 by author Peter

European Windows and ASP.NET Spotlight Hosting Partner in Europe, HostForLIFE.eu, has announced the availability of new hosting plans that are optimized for the latest update of the Drupal 7.37 hosting technology.

HostForLIFE.eu hosts its servers in top class data centers that is located in Amsterdam (NL), London (UK), Paris (FR), Frankfurt(DE) and Seattle (US) to guarantee 99.9% network uptime. All data center feature redundancies in network connectivity, power, HVAC, security, and fire suppression. All hosting plans from HostForLIFE.eu include 24×7 support and 30 days money back guarantee. The customers can start hosting our Drupal site on our environment from as just low €3.00/month only.

Drupal is an open source content management platform powering millions of websites and applications. Thousands of add-on modules and designs let you build any site you can imagine. Drupal 7.37 Includes bug fixes and small API/feature improvements only (no major new functionality); major, non-backwards-compatible new features are only being added to the forthcoming Drupal 8.0 release. If you are looking for the right Windows ASP.NET Hosting provider that support Drupal 7.37, we are the right choice for you.

The 7.37 update also includes fixed a regression in Drupal 7.36 which caused certain kinds of content types to become disabled if we were defined by a no-longer-enabled module, removed a confusing description regarding automatic time zone detection from the user account form (minor UI and data structure change), allowed custom HTML tags with a dash in the name to pass through filter_xss() when specified in the list of allowed tags, allowed hook_field_schema() implementations to specify indexes for fields based on a fixed-length column prefix (rather than the entire column), as was already allowed in hook_schema() implementations, fixed PDO exceptions on PostgreSQL when accessing invalid entity URLs, added a sites/all/libraries folder to the codebase, with instructions for using it and added a description to the "Administer text formats and filters" permission on the Permissions page (string change).

HostForLIFE have hosted large numbers of websites and blogs until now. Our clients come from diverse backgrounds from all sectors of the economy. HostForLIFE.eu clients are specialized in providing supports for Drupal for many years. We are glad to provide support for European Drupal 7.37 hosting users with advices and troubleshooting for our client website when necessary.

HostForLIFE.eu is a popular online Windows based hosting service provider catering to those people who face such issues. The company has managed to build a strong client base in a very short period of time. It is known for offering ultra-fast, fully-managed and secured services in the competitive market. Our powerful servers are especially optimized and ensure Drupal 7.37 performance. We have best data centers on three continent, unique account isolation for security, and 24/7 proactive uptime monitoring.

For more information about this new product, please visit http://hostforlife.eu/European-Drupal-737-Hosting

About HostForLIFE.eu
HostForLIFE.eu is an European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on the Windows Platform only. HostForLIFE.eu deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

HostForLIFE.eu is awarded Top No#1 SPOTLIGHT Recommended Hosting Partner by Microsoft (see http://www.asp.net/hosting/hostingprovider/details/953). Our service is ranked the highest top #1 spot in several European countries, such as: Germany, Italy, Netherlands, France, Belgium, United Kingdom, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and other European countries. Besides this award, we have also won several awards from reputable organizations in the hosting industry and the detail can be found on our official website.



About HostForLIFE.eu

HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

We have offered the latest Windows 2016 Hosting, ASP.NET Core 2.2.1 Hosting, ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting and SQL 2017 Hosting.


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